It’s still National Library Week. You should be especially nice to a librarian today, or tomorrow. Sometime this week, anyway. Probably the librarians would like tea. Or chocolates. Or a reliable source of funding.
Neil Gaiman (via ala-con)

1,845 notes

leahclifford:

truedoommurderhead:

symbiotic-assimilation:

monsoonmo0n:

What children’s drawings would look like if they were painted realistically

Fucking Christ

a dude on a forum i used to frequent had that first one as his avatar for years and i never knew what it was

i’m so relieved 

The Good Man is terrifying. I know it’s probably supposed to be Jesus Christ but that picture is going to haunt me for weeks.

(Source: ledzeppelixn)

88,507 notes

wingthingaling:

The phantasmagorical and surreal animal sculptures by Canadian artist Ellen Jewett. Between dream and nightmare, some strange creations born of a symbiosis between organic and mechanical elements, a meeting between fantasy, gothic and steampunk. Some very detailed sculptures in clay on a metal frame.

Visit her website at http://www.creaturesfromel.ca/

via Ufunk.net

132,111 notes

svyalitchat:

SVYALit Project Index

Using Young Adult literature to talk with teens about sexual violence and consentProject Goals:
To discuss sexual violence in the lives of teens and in ya literature on an ongoing basis 
To raise awareness of the issues and titles that can be used to discuss the topics with teens;
To give librarians, educators and parents the tools to evaluate and discuss these topics in the lives of teens; 
To promote teen reading and literature 
Project Outline and Schedule An indepth look at the books
 From Girl Code
Statistics & Essential InformationIt is estimated that anywhere between 1 out of 6 to as high as 1 out of 3 girls and 1 out of 7 to as high as 1 out of 5 boys is the victim of some type of sexual violence by the time they reach age 18.  It is also believed that true statistics are higher than we think because the incidences of abuse are under-reported. (Sources: 1 in 4 ; The CDC ; The Advocacy Center)For every 161 rape cases filed, only 1 is found to be a false accusation.  This is important because it means that more than 99% of rape allegations are true. 

Teen Sexual Assault and Abuse Info Sheet and Statistics
Recognizing the Signs of Sexual Abuse 

Additional Book Reviews and Booklists Because No Always Mean No, a list of books dealing with sexual assault  Take 5: Difficult books on an important topic (sexual violence)Take 5: Sexual Violence in the Life of Boys   Book Review: The Gospel of Winter by Brendan Kiely Thinking About Boys, Sex, and Sex & Violence by Carrie Mesrobian What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton Plus One by Elizabeth FamaSeptember Girls by Bennett Madison  Discussing THE S WORD by Chelsea Pitcher, a guest post by Lourdes Keochgerien5 Reasons I Loved Faking Normal by Courtney C. StevensSex/Consent Positive Titles: Karen’s List Christa’s List Carrie’s ListBook Review: Uses for Boys by Erica Lorainne Scheidt  The Posts  What It’s Like for a Girl: How Monstrous Beauty by Elizabeth Fama made me think about the politics of sexuality in the life of girls Should there be sex in YA books?  An Anonymous Letter to Those Who Would Ban Eleanor and Park  Who Will Save You? Boundaries, Rescue and the Role of Adults in YA Lit.  A look at consent and respecting boundaries in relationships outside of just sex.  Incest, the last taboo Loud and Clear: A Reflection on Teaching SPEAK by Laurie Halse Anderson in the Classroom Christa Writes: Sexual Violence in YA LitSlut Shaming part 1 and part 2 Silence Hurts Everyone: A further look at Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell and a discussion of why adults don’t intervene more on the behalf of children  Discussing The S Word by Chealsea PitcherTalk About Sex: The Good, The Bad and The UglyWhy Talking About the Age of Consent MattersCanary, Consent and Athlete Adoration Honoring the Survivors, a look at The Gospel of Winter Book Review: Uses for Boys by Erica Lorainne ScheidtDiscussion Panels Recap and Video of the first panel discussing Faultline, Sex & Violence and Where the Stars Still ShineRecap and Video of the second panel discussing Charm & Strange, Canary, and The Gospel of Winter Talking with Teens About Street Harassment Street HarassmentWhat It’s Like for a Girl: How Monstrous Beauty by Elizabeth Fama made me think about the politics of sexuality in the life of girls   That Time Matt Smith Perpetuated Street Harassment Culture at Comic Con#EndSHWeek is March 30th - April 5th Talking with Teens About Human TraffickingRead Kimberly Purcell’s TRAFFICKED for a look at this issue and read her post about writing the book  Human Trafficking: YOU can get involved  The Slave Across the StreetTalking with Teens About Consent Sexual Assault Awareness Month, talking to teens about consent and rape part 1 and part 2 This is What Consent Looks Like  The Curios Case of the Kissing Doctor and Consent 
Sex/Romance in Fiction (including a Ted talk on Making Sexing Normal) by Carrie Mesrobian 
The Healthy Sex Talk: Teaching Kids Consent, Ages 1-21 (the Good Men Project)Why Talking with Teens About the Age of Consent MattersTalking with Teens About Slut ShamingSlut Shaming part 1 and part 2 Discussing The S Word by Chelsea PitcherBooks with Sex or Consent Positive ExamplesKaren’s ListChrista’s ListCarrie’s List        
Book Discussion Guides 
Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson Canary by Rachele Alpine Faking Normal by Courtney C. StevensCharm and Strange by Stephanie KuehnScars by Cheryl Rainfield (also deals with self-harm) Additional ResourcesWhat is Rape Culture? What “Rape Culture” Means Systemic Barriers: Gender Socialization | Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness CenterEnding Widespread Violence Against Women: Promoting Gender Equality: UNFPAMyth and Facts about Sexual Abuse, Violence and Rape (from 1 in 6)A Guide to Male Sale Assault from RAINN 
Why We Need to Talk to Our Sons About Rape
Rape is Grossly Underreported in the U.S., study finds Speak and Steubenville: Can YA Help?Now and Forever: The Power of Sex in Young Adult LiteratureWhy YA Sex Scenes Matter Let’s (Not) Get it On: Girls and Sex in Young Adult Literature by Amanda McGregor, VOYA (February 2004, pages 464-468)The Steubenville Rape Case: How to talk to your teen about sexual assaultHow to Talk to Your Son about Date RapeNPR: How Parents Talk to Children about ConsentHigh School Students Teach Us How to Talk about RapeSelf Care After Rape                
  Please visit RAINN (Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network) to learn more Stop Street Harassment is an organization dedicated to raising awareness about Street Harassment The Good Men Project looks at cultural masculinity and addresses thinks like rape culture and more
Follow the #SVYALit Tumblr for updates and additional postsThis index will be updated on an ongoing basisHow to Use the #SVYALit Project Index: “Books are a safe way to help teens process topics we know they are thinking about. Here are some things you can do in your library to get the discussion going in your library—and also implement ways to help teens who themselves have been impacted by SV.
Contact your local hospital and see if they have a SANE nurse (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner). SANE nurses can come to your school and library and give talks about healthy relationships, consent, unhealthy and abusive relationships, recognizing the signs of sexual violence and more. They will usually do this for free as part of their outreach.
Put together a panel of local communities who work with youth to discuss the various resources in your immediate community that can help teens. Or have a health fair and include this type of information.
Have a book discussion group on the various titles we are discussing in SVYALit, and watch the author discussion panels.
At the very least, share relevant information with your community by building displays, putting together booklists and resources, and discussion guides. For example, a variety of discussion guides for Speak can be found online.
There is evidence to suggest that promoting gender equality can help decrease sexual violence. So consider creating integrated book displays based on themes like plagues, dystopians, action and adventure, etc. instead of promoting gendered displays like “boy books” and “girl books.” See also: Boys Will Be Boys and Girls Will Be Accomodating by author Laurel Snyder.” - excepted from Launching a Dialogue About Sexual Violence in YA Lit—and in Real Life at School Library Journal

svyalitchat:

SVYALit Project Index

imageUsing Young Adult literature to talk with teens about sexual violence and consent

Project Goals:

  • To discuss sexual violence in the lives of teens and in ya literature on an ongoing basis
  • To raise awareness of the issues and titles that can be used to discuss the topics with teens;
  • To give librarians, educators and parents the tools to evaluate and discuss these topics in the lives of teens; 
  • To promote teen reading and literature

Project Outline and Schedule
An indepth look at the books

image From Girl Code

Statistics & Essential Information
It is estimated that anywhere between 1 out of 6 to as high as 1 out of 3 girls and 1 out of 7 to as high as 1 out of 5 boys is the victim of some type of sexual violence by the time they reach age 18.  It is also believed that true statistics are higher than we think because the incidences of abuse are under-reported. (Sources: 1 in 4 ; The CDC ; The Advocacy Center)

For every 161 rape cases filed, only 1 is found to be a false accusation.  This is important because it means that more than 99% of rape allegations are true.


Additional Book Reviews and Booklists
Because No Always Mean No, a list of books dealing with sexual assault  
Take 5: Difficult books on an important topic (sexual violence)
Take 5: Sexual Violence in the Life of Boys  
Book Review: The Gospel of Winter by Brendan Kiely 
Thinking About Boys, Sex, and Sex & Violence by Carrie Mesrobian 
What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton 
Plus One by Elizabeth Fama
September Girls by Bennett Madison  
Discussing THE S WORD by Chelsea Pitcher, a guest post by Lourdes Keochgerien
5 Reasons I Loved Faking Normal by Courtney C. Stevens
Sex/Consent Positive Titles: Karen’s List Christa’s List Carrie’s List
Book Review: Uses for Boys by Erica Lorainne Scheidt


The Posts 
What It’s Like for a Girl: How Monstrous Beauty by Elizabeth Fama made me think about the politics of sexuality in the life of girls
Should there be sex in YA books? 
An Anonymous Letter to Those Who Would Ban Eleanor and Park
Who Will Save You? Boundaries, Rescue and the Role of Adults in YA Lit.  A look at consent and respecting boundaries in relationships outside of just sex. 
Incest, the last taboo 

Loud and Clear: A Reflection on Teaching SPEAK by Laurie Halse Anderson in the Classroom
Christa Writes: Sexual Violence in YA Lit
Slut Shaming part 1 and part 2 
Silence Hurts Everyone: A further look at Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell and a discussion of why adults don’t intervene more on the behalf of children 
Discussing The S Word by Chealsea Pitcher
Talk About Sex: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
Why Talking About the Age of Consent Matters
Canary, Consent and Athlete Adoration 
Honoring the Survivors, a look at The Gospel of Winter
Book Review: Uses for Boys by Erica Lorainne Scheidt


Discussion Panels
Recap and Video of the first panel discussing Faultline, Sex & Violence and Where the Stars Still Shine

Recap and Video of the second panel discussing Charm & Strange, Canary, and The Gospel of Winter

Talking with Teens About Street Harassment
Street Harassment
What It’s Like for a Girl: How Monstrous Beauty by Elizabeth Fama made me think about the politics of sexuality in the life of girls
That Time Matt Smith Perpetuated Street Harassment Culture at Comic Con
#EndSHWeek is March 30th - April 5th

Talking with Teens About Human Trafficking
Read Kimberly Purcell’s TRAFFICKED for a look at this issue and read her post about writing the book
Human Trafficking: YOU can get involved
The Slave Across the Street

Talking with Teens About Consent
Sexual Assault Awareness Month, talking to teens about consent and rape part 1 and part 2
This is What Consent Looks Like
The Curios Case of the Kissing Doctor and Consent 

Book Discussion Guides 

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
Canary by Rachele Alpine
Faking Normal by Courtney C. Stevens
Charm and Strange by Stephanie Kuehn
Scars by Cheryl Rainfield (also deals with self-harm)

Additional Resources
What is Rape Culture? 
What “Rape Culture” Means 
Systemic Barriers: Gender Socialization | Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center
Ending Widespread Violence Against Women: Promoting Gender Equality: UNFPA
Myth and Facts about Sexual Abuse, Violence and Rape (from 1 in 6)
A Guide to Male Sale Assault from RAINN 


Follow the #SVYALit Tumblr for updates and additional posts
This index will be updated on an ongoing basis

How to Use the #SVYALit Project Index:

“Books are a safe way to help teens process topics we know they are thinking about. Here are some things you can do in your library to get the discussion going in your library—and also implement ways to help teens who themselves have been impacted by SV.

  • Contact your local hospital and see if they have a SANE nurse (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner). SANE nurses can come to your school and library and give talks about healthy relationships, consent, unhealthy and abusive relationships, recognizing the signs of sexual violence and more. They will usually do this for free as part of their outreach.
  • Put together a panel of local communities who work with youth to discuss the various resources in your immediate community that can help teens. Or have a health fair and include this type of information.
  • Have a book discussion group on the various titles we are discussing in SVYALit, and watch the author discussion panels.
  • At the very least, share relevant information with your community by building displays, putting together booklists and resources, and discussion guides. For example, a variety of discussion guides for Speak can be found online.

There is evidence to suggest that promoting gender equality can help decrease sexual violence. So consider creating integrated book displays based on themes like plagues, dystopians, action and adventure, etc. instead of promoting gendered displays like “boy books” and “girl books.” See also: Boys Will Be Boys and Girls Will Be Accomodating by author Laurel Snyder.” - excepted from Launching a Dialogue About Sexual Violence in YA Lit—and in Real Life at School Library Journal

22 notes

Creative Nonsense- Teen Art and Writing Group!!!!  Every Monday from 6PM-8PM!!!

Creative Nonsense- Teen Art and Writing Group!!!!  Every Monday from 6PM-8PM!!!

fishingboatproceeds:

Earlier today I received an email from a high school English teacher in Strasburg, Colorado who plans to teach an elective Young Adult literature course. A group of parents created a petition to “cleanse” the book list, claiming that the majority of the books on…

I like the alliteration of “criminal, crass, crude,” but otherwise … yeah. Ignorant, idiotic, insipid.

12,480 notes